Home > Blog > Singles are A Vital Part of Our Churches [Part 2]

September 1, 2018

Singles are A Vital Part of Our Churches [Part 2]

By Ed Stetzer

Previously, I talked about the problem that many churches have when it comes to treating the singles in our churches as whole and equal to the marrieds. Notably, however, singles have been critical to the spread and influence of Christianity. Today, I want to discuss where we go from here.

So what do we do? Below I share three ways we can integrate singles fully into the life of our churches.

First, be careful with your language.

One of the problems we have is our language. For example, when we talk about our churches, we often ask things like, “Are you a family-centered church?”

What does this even mean? Most of us would recognize there are many different kinds of families in life and in the church. There are blended families. There are single-parent families. There are nuclear families, traditional families, multi-generational families. You might know you mean to include all of them when you say “family-centered,” but most people are going to imagine a nuclear family – two parents and their children – when you say it.

You might even mean “families” to include singles, but almost no one is going to hear that.

Similarly, it is incorrect to describe our churches as having “singles and families.” This makes it seem like the single people are on the outside. When I’m talking about issues of race and ethnicity, I usually include several different examples of races and ethnicities. I might say “Thank God for people of African American and Anglo and Latino and Asian backgrounds, and many others.”

In the same vein of thinking, I might say, “We thank God for single people and married people and blended families.” Include some other people in your list. This shows that you value all of them equally.

People notice things as simple as this. People hear when you point out who they are. Keep in mind that singles are probably at least a significant minority of people in your church, if not a majority of it. We always want to make sure those who have historically felt invisible instead feel loved, seen, and heard. Using language that affirms and includes all people can help shape the culture of your church and the perception of what you’re doing.

Second, include singles among your leadership.

If you are not facilitating and fostering single leaders in the life of your church, you’re sidelining a large portion of your church. Furthermore, you’re buying into more of a Western cultural value of the nuclear family than holding to biblical values. Look to the Bible, look at Paul’s words. Look at Jesus. Remember, Jesus was a single man. If Jesus wouldn’t have a place in your church, you’ve got a major problem.

Paul’s words are very clear. He points out that we have greater freedom to minister if we are single because we are not distracted. Those who are married, including myself, have other priorities that make our capacity for ministry limited.

So it becomes a good strategy as well to look for places and pathways to involve singles in our leadership. Single people are often looked on with some suspicion as we wonder why they aren’t married yet. The end result is that we’re sometimes suspicious to put them in leadership.

It’s time to stop looking upon single people with suspicion and instead thank God for them. When we don’t put people in places of leadership simply because they are single, we have a leadership problem.

We must be cautious of swinging too far the other way as well, however. I’ve heard some singles say that sometimes when people find out they’re single, they want to put everything on them because they have the time to do those things. We need to strike a balance. Paul’s words are that there’s more freedom to do ministry. Simultaneously, we want to recognize and honor that single people have other lives, friendships, relationships, and more that matter too.

Leadership opportunities are a great way to integrate singles into a more visible and affirming presence in the life of our church, but we must be careful to treat them with love and not burn them out.

Third, listen to your singles.

Things like language and leadership can be helpful, but we need to make sure we are listening to our singles as well. A lot of singles really want a singles ministry, and a lot of singles don’t. We need to listen to the single people in our churches and ask them, “How do you want to be better incorporated into the life of the church?” If you incorporate singles into your leadership team, make sure you listen to what they suggest.

A word of caution

Don’t fall into the trap that some do of befriending only or mainly people who are like you. For example, I’m married, so there’s a natural tendency for me to hang around married couples. Many couples generally only have friends who are couples.

Instead, I would exhort you to ask yourself, “Have I built relationships with single men and women in my church in a way that helps me understand who they are and how I can pastor them well?” I think there’s a sense for singles that we are excluding them in the life of the church in ways that are ultimately unhelpful.

Let’s work on our language, put people in leadership, and listen to how they best like to be understood and then pastored. Our churches will be better and stronger for it.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Ed Stetzer

Ed Stetzer (@edstetzer), Ph.D., holds the Billy Graham Distinguished Chair for Church, Mission, and Evangelism at Wheaton College. Ed also serves as the Executive Director of the Billy Graham Center for Evangelism at Wheaton, and as chair of the Evangelism and Leadership Program in the Graduate School. Ed is a prolific author, and well-known conference speaker. He has planted, revitalized, and pastored churches, trained pastors and church planters on six continents, holds two masters degrees and two doctorates, and has written a dozen books and hundreds of articles. Stetzer is a contributing editor for Christianity Today, a columnist for Outreach Magazine, and is frequently cited or interviewed in news outlets such as USAToday and CNN. He is also the Executive Editor of The Gospel Project, which is used by over 1 million individuals each week. As of fall 2015, Stetzer co-hosts BreakPoint This Week, a radio broadcast that airs on over 400 media outlets. He also serves the teaching pastor at Christ Fellowship, a multi-cultural megachurch in Miami, Florida.

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