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June 23, 2016

Cultivating the Organization People Want to Serve In

By Daniel Im

*Plus Members can watch this entire Webinar by logging in and clicking here.

Finding an Organizational Rhythm

I love singing. Now, just because I love to sing doesn’t mean that I can sing. Nevertheless, if I hear a good tune with great lyrics—once I learn the lyrics—I’m diving in participating in the song. Interestingly, I believe I’m not the only one who does this. It seems that our culture loves good music with lyrics that move them. When people hear music that makes them want to tap their feet and lyrics that makes them want to move their lips they participate in the song.

Leaders can learn a lot from music that makes people want to join in and participate. Just as artists attempt to craft a song with rhythm that physically moves people and words that emotionally move people, leaders should attempt to cultivate an organizational rhythm that attracts people to want to pour their heart, soul, and body into the mission of the organization.

Recently, Ed and I connected with Shelley Trebesch, author of Made to Flourish, where we talked about how organizations (particularly churches) can flourish by creating an organizational rhythm whereby people are recruited, developed, and mobilized to participate in the mission and vision of the organization. There were at least five rhythms that Shelley discussed.

  1. Get people to say yes to serving. Shelley adheres to Bobby Clinton’s Leadership Emergence Theory, which holds that leadership development means getting people to try stuff. Thus, one of the main keys to creating an organizational rhythm is recruiting people to start serving somewhere. Through recruitment—regardless of whether it is setting up chairs, running pro-presenter, directing traffic, rocking babies in the nursery, or playing in the band—churches connect people to the mission and vision of the organization. According to Shelley, when people start with yes and gain serving experience God gives shape to their call and manifest their areas of giftedness.
  2. Highlight heroic stories of other ordinary servants. Many times stories of service surround the pastor, church planter, or someone who’s a paid professional. But, according to Shelley, one way to bring clarity to how other people can serve the organization and participate in the mission and vision is by highlighting and celebrating the ordinary, everyday people who already give of their time, talents, and treasure. Such people are like Epaphroditus—a “subtle superstar”—servants who, according to the apostle Paul, should be received with joy and be given honor (Phil 2:25–30). By highlighting other ordinary heroes, you show how other people are participating in the mission and vision of the organization, thus cultivating an organizational rhythm.
  3. Make the vision visible and accessible. When people walk into the building or gathering where you meet what do they see? When people surf your website, what do they see? When people are handed any visible print, what do they read? When staff welcome people to the gathering, what do they say? At every opportunity an organization—whether written, verbal, or decorative—needs to communicate their mission and vision. By doing so, the organization communicates that they not only own the mission and vision but want those part of the organization to own it as well. Thus, embedding the mission and vision into the very fabric of an organization helps create a culture whereby people are encouraged to join in the mission. The more visible and accessible the mission and vision is, the more rhythmic the organizational becomes.

To read the final two rhythms that help organizations recruit, develop, and mobilize leaders and to listen to the entire Webinar with Shelley Trebesch click here.

This video is part of Plus Membership, so to get full access to it, and much more, I encourage you to become a Plus Member. Click here to see all the benefits of becoming a Plus Member.

Tweetables:

  • Leaders can learn a lot from music that makes people want to join in and participate.
  • Leaders should be like song artists—attempting to move people to participate in the song.
  • Finding your organizational rhythm moves people to participate in the mission and vision of your organization.
  • One of the main keys to creating an organizational rhythm is recruiting people to start serving somewhere.
  • “When people start with yes and gain serving experience God gives shape to their call and manifest their areas of giftedness.” -Shelley Trebesch
  • At every opportunity an organization needs to communicate their mission and vision.
  • The more visible and accessible the mission and vision is, the more rhythmic the organizational becomes.
  • “Character is more important than talent or ability.” -Shelley Trebesch
  • God’s doesn’t need our outstanding ability but rather our availability and faithfulness.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Daniel Im

Daniel Im (@danielsangi) is the Founder of NewChurches.com and the Director of Church Multiplication for LifeWay Christian Resources. He is a Teaching Pastor at The Fellowship, a multisite church in Nashville. He is the author of No Silver Bullets: Five Small Shifts that will Transform Your Ministry, and co-author of Planting Missional Churches: Your Guide to Starting Churches that Multiply (2nd ed) with Ed Stetzer. He also co-hosts the New Churches Q&A Podcast, the 5 Leadership Questions Podcast, and a brand new podcast with his wife on marriage and parenting called the IMbetween Podcast. He has an M.A. in Global Leadership and has served and pastored in church plants and multisite churches ranging from 100 people to 50,000 people in Vancouver, Ottawa, Montreal, Korea, Edmonton, and Nashville. Visit Danielim.com to learn more.

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